Increasing the size of a VDI, by cloning it

The command-line tools didn’t work, so I found an excellent tool at https://forums.virtualbox.org/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=22422 :

 

 

All in all, that didn’t solve the problem of the partition itself being full….

So I found this http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/virtualbox-cdrom.html, which gave me the right clues.

This allowed me to boot into the LiveCD, to be able to resize the Linux BOOT Partition!

This worked well, without further intervention!

Pi-Mimic interface address decoding

 

SW1

SW2

SW3

SW4

             

True Address

/A0

/A1

/A2

n.c

A0

A1

A2

 

A2

A1

A0

 

On

On

On

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

0X20

On

On

Off

 

0

0

1

 

1

0

0

0X24

On

Off

On

 

0

1

0

 

0

1

0

0X22

On

Off

Off

 

0

1

1

 

1

1

0

0X26

Off

On

On

 

1

0

0

 

0

0

1

0X21

Off

On

Off

 

1

0

1

 

1

0

1

0X25

Off

Off

On

 

1

1

0

 

0

1

1

0X23

Off

Off

Off

 

1

1

1

 

1

1

1

0X27

 

True Address

SW1

SW2

SW3

SW4

 

/A0

/A1

/A2

n.c

0X20

On

On

On

 

0X21

Off

On

On

 

0X22

On

Off

On

 

0X23

Off

Off

On

 

0X24

On

On

Off

 

0X25

Off

On

Off

 

0X26

On

Off

Off

 

0X27

Off

Off

Off

 

Testing the MimicPi protottype

In case of a ‘bew’ SD Card, I2C is not enabled by default on the RPi, and there are few steps you need to follow.

Enabling I2C in the RPi

  • First go to: 
    /etc/modules

    and add the following lines:
    • i2c-bcm2708
    • i2c-dev
  • Install
    i2c-tools.  This is not required, but it’s very handy for detecting devices and making sure everything works properly.
    • sudo apt-get install python-smbus
    • sudo apt-get install i2c-tools
  • There is a file called
    raspi-blacklist.conf, and by default SPI and I2C are part of this black list!
    • Edit
      /etc/modprobe.d/raspi-blacklist.conf
        and comment out the lines
      • blacklist spi-bcm2708
      • blacklist i2c-bcm2708

 

Verifying the communication:

Once we connect the board to the RPi, we can continue to check if we can actually see it as a I2C device. 

  • Try running on your pi: 
    sudo i2cdetect -y 1  or sudo i2cdetect -y 0(0 for the 256 Pi model B).
  • You should be able to see your device on the table.  The following snapshot shows two I2C devices, one at address 40 and the second on address 70.

 

  • You should also see a couple of new entries under
    /dev:
  • spidev0.0
    • spidev0.1
    • I2c-0
    • I2c-1
  • If don’t see any of these entries, try running:
    • sudo modprobe i2c-dev

 

This is NOT kosher:

 

With all four cards fitted, this what we should see (obviously different addresses may be used):

Setting the Application into CAPTURER Mode

Copy the application to a centrally-accessible location, e.g. Z Drive.

From the CAPTURER”S PC, copy the application from the repository, to their ‘My Documents’ Folder. Make a shortcut for them.

Start the application, and choose System Maintenance:

Click the ‘SetAppTypeCapturer’ button.

Close and re-open the application.

It will now be set to CAPTURER MODE: